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Arch Bishop Ralph Vendegna S.O.S.M.A.

Office Readings


  • Friday 31 July 2020

    Saint Ignatius Loyola, Priest 
    on Friday of week 17 in Ordinary Time


    Office of Readings


    Introduction (without Invitatory)

    If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, use the version with the Invitatory Psalm instead.


    O God, come to our aid.
    O Lord, make haste to help us.
    Glory be to the Father and to the Son
    and to the Holy Spirit,
    as it was in the beginning,
    is now, and ever shall be,
    world without end.
    Amen. Alleluia.


    ________

    Hymn

    In ancient times God spoke to us
    Through prophets, and in varied ways,
    But now he speaks through Christ his Son,
    His radiance through eternal days.

    To God the Father of the world,
    His Son through whom he made all things,
    And Holy Spirit, bond of love,
    All glad creation glory sings.

    Stanbrook Abbey Hymnal

    ________

    Psalm 34 (35)
    The Lord, a saviour in time of persecution


    “They united in making plans to arrest Jesus by treachery and have him put to death” (Mt 26:3,4).

    O Lord, arise to help me.

    O Lord, plead my cause against my foes;
    fight those who fight me.
    Take up your buckler and shield;
    arise to help me.

    O Lord, say to my soul:
    ‘I am your salvation.’

    But my soul shall be joyful in the Lord
    and rejoice in his salvation.
    My whole being will say:
    ‘Lord, who is like you
    who rescue the weak from the strong
    and the poor from the oppressor?’

    Lying witnesses arise
    and accuse me unjustly.
    They repay me evil for good;
    my soul is forlorn.

    Glory be to the Father and to the Son
    and to the Holy Spirit,
    as it was in the beginning,
    is now, and ever shall be,
    world without end.
    Amen.

    O Lord, arise to help me.


    ________

    Psalm 34 (35)

    Lord, plead my cause; defend me with your strength.

    When they were sick I went into mourning,
    afflicted with fasting.
    My prayer was ever on my lips,
    as for a brother, a friend.
    I went as though mourning a mother,
    bowed down with grief.

    Now that I am in trouble they gather,
    they gather and mock me.
    They take me by surprise and strike me
    and tear me to pieces.
    They provoke me with mockery on mockery
    and gnash their teeth.

    Glory be to the Father and to the Son
    and to the Holy Spirit,
    as it was in the beginning,
    is now, and ever shall be,
    world without end.
    Amen.

    Lord, plead my cause; defend me with your strength.


    ________

    Psalm 34 (35)

    My tongue shall speak of your justice, all day long.

    O Lord, how long will you look on?
    Come to my rescue!
    Save my life from these raging beasts,
    my soul from these lions.
    I will thank you in the great assembly,
    amid the throng I will praise you.

    Do not let my lying foes
    rejoice over me.
    Do not let those who hate me unjustly
    wink eyes at each other.

    O Lord, you have seen, do not be silent,
    do not stand afar off!
    Awake, stir to my defence,
    to my cause, O God!

    Let there be joy for those who love my cause.
    Let them say without end:
    ‘Great is the Lord who delights
    in the peace of his servant.’
    Then my tongue shall speak of your justice,
    all day long of your praise.

    Glory be to the Father and to the Son
    and to the Holy Spirit,
    as it was in the beginning,
    is now, and ever shall be,
    world without end.
    Amen.

    My tongue shall speak of your justice, all day long.


    Psalm-prayer

    Lord, you rescue the poor from their oppressors, and you rose to the aid of your beloved Son against those who unjustly sought his life. Look on your Church as we journey to you, that the poor and weak may recognize the help you provide and proclaim your saving acts.


    ________

    ℣. You will hear the word from my mouth.
    ℟. You will speak to them in my name.


    ________


    Readings (official one-year cycle)

    First Reading
    2 Corinthians 11:30-12:13
    Paul glories in his weakness

    If I am to boast, then let me boast of my own feebleness. The God and Father of the Lord Jesus – bless him for ever – knows that I am not lying. When I was in Damascus, the ethnarch of King Aretas put guards round the city to catch me, and I had to be let down over the wall in a hamper, through a window, in order to escape.
    Must I go on boasting, though there is nothing to be gained by it? But I will move on to the visions and revelations I have had from the Lord. I know a man in Christ who, fourteen years ago, was caught up – whether still in the body or out of the body, I do not know; God knows – right into the third heaven. I do know, however, that this same person – whether in the body or out of the body, I do not know; God knows – was caught up into paradise and heard things which must not and cannot be put into human language. I will boast about a man like that, but not about anything of my own except my weaknesses. If I should decide to boast, I should not be made to look foolish, because I should only be speaking the truth; but I am not going to, in case anyone should begin to think I am better than he can actually see and hear me to be.
    In view of the extraordinary nature of these revelations, to stop me from getting too proud I was given a thorn in the flesh, an angel of Satan to beat me and stop me from getting too proud! About this thing, I have pleaded with the Lord three times for it to leave me, but he has said, ‘My grace is enough for you: my power is at its best in weakness.’ So I shall be very happy to make my weaknesses my special boast so that the power of Christ may stay over me, and that is why I am quite content with my weaknesses, and with insults, hardships, persecutions, and the agonies I go through for Christ’s sake. For it is when I am weak that I am strong.
    I have been talking like a fool, but you forced me to do it: you are the ones who should have been commending me. Though I am a nobody, there is not a thing these arch-apostles have that I do not have as well. You have seen done among you all the things that mark the true apostle, unfailingly produced: the signs, the marvels, the miracles. Is there anything of which you have had less than the other churches have had, except that I have not myself been a burden on you? For this unfairness, please forgive me.


    Responsory
    2 Co 12:9, 4:7

    ℟. I will gladly boast of my weaknesses, so that I may feel the protection of God’s power over me,* for his power is strongest when we are weak.
    ℣. We have a spiritual treasure hidden in earthenware vessels, to show that the supreme power belongs to God and not to us,* for his power is strongest when we are weak.


    ________

    Second Reading
    From the acts of Saint Ignatius in his own words, taken down by Luis González
    Put inward experiences to the test to see if they come from God

    Ignatius was passionately fond of reading worldly books of fiction and tales of knight-errantry. When he felt he was getting better, he asked for some of these books to pass the time. But no book of that sort could be found in the house; instead they gave him a life of Christ and a collection of the lives of saints written in Spanish.
    By constantly reading these books he began to be attracted to what he found narrated there. Sometimes in the midst of his reading he would reflect on what he had read. Yet at other times he would dwell on many of the things which he had been accustomed to dwell on previously. But at this point our Lord came to his assistance, insuring that these thoughts were followed by others which arose from his current reading.
    While reading the life of Christ our Lord or the lives of the saints, he would reflect and reason with himself: “What if I should do what Saint Francis or Saint Dominic did?” In this way he let his mind dwell on many thoughts; they lasted a while until other things took their place. Then those vain and worldly images would come into his mind and remain a long time. This sequence of thoughts persisted with him for a long time.
    But there was a difference. When Ignatius reflected on worldly thoughts, he felt intense pleasure; but when he gave them up out of weariness, he felt dry and depressed. Yet when he thought of living the rigorous sort of life he knew the saints had lived, he not only experienced pleasure when he actually thought about it, but even after he dismissed these thoughts, he still experienced great joy. Yet he did not pay attention to this, nor did he appreciate it until one day, in a moment of insight, he began to marvel at the difference. Then he understood his experience: thoughts of one kind left him sad, the others full of joy. And this was the first time he applied a process of reasoning to his religious experience. Later on, when he began to formulate his spiritual exercises, he used this experience as an illustration to explain the doctrine he taught his disciples on the discernment of spirits.


    Responsory

    ℟. Whoever preaches must preach God’s words; whoever serves must serve with the strength that God gives him,* so that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ.
    ℣. Above everything, love one another sincerely,* so that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ.


    ________

    Let us pray.

    Lord God,
    you raised up Saint Ignatius Loyola in your Church
    to give greater glory to your name.
    Grant that, aided by his prayers,
    we may fight against all that is evil on earth,
    and with him receive the crown of victory in heaven.
    Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
    who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
    one God, for ever and ever.
    Amen.


    ________

    Let us praise the Lord.
    – Thanks be to God.


    Copyright © 1996-2020 Universalis Publishing Limited: see www.universalis.com. Scripture readings from the Jerusalem Bible are published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd, Ltd and Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc, and used by permission of the publishers. Text of the Psalms: Copyright © 1963, The Grail (England). Used with permission of A.P. Watt Ltd. All rights reserved.

     

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